Sunday, May 24, 2020

Mesopotamia Vs. Egypt Mesopotamia - 1020 Words

Marley Buckley C Block History Mr. Kelly 10/2/15 Mesopotamia vs. Egypt Mesopotamia and Egypt were very different because of their geography and world view. Mesopotamia was often flooded because of their bad geography, but the land around the Nile river was built well so the Egyptians didn t have to worry about the river flooding as often. The land in Mesopotamia was often attacked and invaded. Ultimately the geography of Egypt was significantly better than Mesopotamia because of the benefits of the nile river created a positive world view, a strong government and a universal religion. Mesopotamia’s land required more work than Egypt s because of their unscheduled flooding. The land in Mesopotamia was fertile, but was very harsh due to the amount of excess water coming off the two rivers. The people in Mesopotamia had a bad world view because they were constantly working and fixing the land and it would get ruined again after the flooding because it was constant. The Epic of Gilgamesh connects to the flooding of the river because his writings showed how the Mesopotamians were under the mercy of the gods. It also described how the Mesopotamians had to keep fixing their land after the unscheduled flooding. The people of Mesopotamia also had bad world because of the overload of water that caused them to have a surplus of food. The Nile allowed the Egyptians to work their crops instead of worrying about the river, unlike the people in Mesopotamia. Due to the flooding of theShow MoreRelatedAncient Egypt vs. Mesopotamia - Comparative Essay988 Words   |  4 Page sAncient Egypt and Mesopotamia Egypt and Mesopotamia, although similar, are different as a result of one major natural resource: a river. Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia were an agricultural based society that believed in the existence of many deities; however, they differed in the aspect of how they evolved as an agricultural society and whether they feared or praised their gods. Mesopotamia, also known as the Fertile Crescent, was located inside the Euphrates and Tigris River. The fertile landRead MoreAp World History Compare and Contrast Essay Egypt vs. Mesopotamia632 Words   |  3 Pagesfor agricultural production. 2 of the greatest river-valley civilizations were Mesopotamia and Egypt. All though they both supported having a patriarchal leader or king, Egypt had a strong, centralized government, whereas Mesopotamia was decentralized, and built based on small city-states operating independently. In both societies, the patriarchal leaders were influenced by religion tremendously. For example, in Egypt, all the citizens believed that not only did their pharoah have â€Å"powers†, butRead MoreMesopotamia and Egypt Comparative Essay876 Words   |  4 PagesMatthew B Owens World History AP-3 21 September 2011 Mesopotamia and Egypt Comparative Essay While both the Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations share similar political, social and economic qualities, the details of these broad spectrums branch off in opposite directions. For example, both Mesopotamia and Egypt were ruled by kings, but in Egypt, their kings were called pharaohs and they had significantly more power than the Mesopotamian kings of the city-states. Both civilizations also hadRead MoreComparing The Egyptians And The Mesopotamians Essay1449 Words   |  6 Pagesneolithic civilizations. They both grew crops and they both relied on agriculture and had many rulers as time went on. We start at Egypt In 3100 B.C and Mesopotamians at 5000 B.C (1). The Nile river was a key place for the start of the Ancient Egyptian empire. Egyptians themselves were located near lower Egypt closeby the Nile Delta. They then slowly moved up around upper egypt. With clear fertile and rich soil, agriculture was most efficient and made the Ancient Egyptians very rich. Mesopotamians alsoRead MoreThe Dead Vs. The Living1611 Words   |  7 PagesThe Dead Vs. The Living Government has come from killing to keeping. When talking about the evolution of government, within the western world, there are tremendous amounts of changes; beliefs, or perhaps intentions to be mentioned. In the beginning there were many laws in place that enforced the killing of people, or sentencing of death, for their wrong doing(s). Yet, down the road, came laws that seem to be less harsh on society and to the people who were being accused. Also, the beliefs and structureRead MoreHow Do The Neolithic And Paleolithic Revolutions Differ?1657 Words   |  7 Pagesuncivilized has adapted to present a group of â€Å"savages† who are ignorant to the life us civilized people enjoy. This is because the civilized people won. They overpowered the uncivilized so they became better. The controversy exists in the literal meaning vs. the adapted meaning and connotation. 4. According to social scientists, which basic traits emerge when a society becomes civilized? Once a society becomes civilized it tends to naturally form universal traits. This includes agriculture (a necessity)Read MoreRise of Greek Civilization Essay641 Words   |  3 Pagesdevelopment of civilizations (E.g. writing in 4000 B.C.) in Egypt and Mesopotamia? When were the pyramids built? How did Gods get associated with morality, as in breaching law became impiety? What was the oldest legal code of Hammurabi, the king of Babylon? What was the Babylonian contribution to the growth of man? How was the Babylonian knowledge inherited by Thales in the 6th century? Points Sudden rise of civilization in Greece Role of Egypt Babylon (both around 2000 B.C) and the island of Crete(MinoanRead More Comparison of Babylonian Art vs. Egyptian Art Essay875 Words   |  4 PagesComparison of Babylonian Art vs. Egyptian Art Over the history of man, there have been many prosperous empires that ruled in different parts of the world. Babylon and Egypt are two of these empires that ruled almost 500 years apart, but had one thing in common, great artistic works. Wall paintings such as the Babylonian work Investiture of Zimrilim, and the Egyptian Queen Neferati Making an Offering to Isis are examples of the great works of their times. Both pieces are rich in meaning andRead MoreThe Hungarian Culture And The Armenian Culture1398 Words   |  6 PagesIndo-European language family. There are actually two types of the Armenian language and alphabet, eastern Armenian is spoken in the Republic of Armenia, and other various parts of the world. Western Armenia was spoken more in parts of Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, egypt, and other places. And Western Hayeren also got its influence from some of the languages spoken in those areas. Both forms of Armenian use the same alphabet, with different pronunciations. Like Latin is to Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, etcRead MoreWhat Do The Myths Show About The Idea Of Order Vs. Chaos Essay973 Words   |  4 PagesTopic 1: What do the myths show about the idea of order vs. chaos and/or good vs. evil and what does that say/show about each culture? Persian and Hinduism myths paints both these ancient cultures as having an opposing negative supremacy that is eventually defeated with time, patience, and worship. George Santayana is a mastermind who scripted a website document named â€Å"Ancient Myth, Religion, and Philosophy†. Santayana describes Zoroastrianism as a view of time and reality in a battle that will

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Social Class, Race, And Capitalism Essay - 2329 Words

The 2016 Election Year will be one to remember for its controversy and voter turnout. Many people have voiced their opinion about each candidate on social media and through protests during and after the election. Many people of all race and class have registered to vote because they felt it was time for their voice to be heard. The results were a shock to a majority but to some it was highly predictable. Looking at the election through a sociological perspective we can identify some characteristics each candidate had that made them likeable and some are only showing what they want others to see of them. Throughout this election there has been conflict of social class, race, and capitalism. The following five sociologists have theories that predict the outcome of the 2016 election; Goffman, Weber, DuBois, Mills, and Marx. Erving Goffman is one of the most important American sociological theorist in the second half of the century and was also influenced by Durkheim, Freud, and Simmel in his work. He is well known for his analysis of human interaction which is now called â€Å"dramaturgical analysis†. Dramaturgical Analysis is the study of social interaction in terms of theatrical performance. For example, Goffman uses terms like â€Å"front†, â€Å"setting†, and â€Å"performance† when explaining his theory. The front is also known as the expressive equipment, intentional or unintentional kind employed by the performer. The setting is also part of the front and involves the physical layout likeShow MoreRelatedAdditionally, In His Book â€Å"Distinction,† Bourdieu Discusses1321 Words   |  6 Pagesdifferent class factions within social spaces, of the â€Å"sacred† sphere of culture that legitimates social order. Therefore, people undoubtedly know their place w ithin society as well quickly identify other individuals who are within their class are other factions of society that are not parts of the upper class via their pretentious actions. (p. 6-7). According to Bourdieu, Class â€Å"is not defined by real property† but is determined by the structure of relations between values art, social graces andRead MoreRepresentation Of Class And Class Struggle1166 Words   |  5 PagesLater theorist like Hall and Chakrabarty assert traditional early social science premised on white patriarchal, male dominated European colonialism and ideology alone, does nott consider the important values of other cultures and the articulation of race in the historical development and Capitalism. Thus they assert that the past, and present practices and histories of other races, cultures’ and cultures practices thwart the totalizing attempt of the earlier theorist like Gramsci and Bourdieu. ChakrabartyRead MoreKarl Marx s View On Race And Ethnicity86 5 Words   |  4 PagesRace is rarely mentioned by the three early proponents of the field of sociology, Karl Marx, Emiele Durkheim and Max Weber. However, when it is cited, these sociologists voiced very diverse opinions on the matter of race and oppression. Marx regarded race as vestige of the pre-industrial era and thus, would be superseded by â€Å"reductionism† (Cite). Emiele Durkheim believed race, which he referred to as â€Å"ethnicity,† was a factor in connecting an individual to a subgroup of society, but played littleRead MoreThe Election Of Obama Into The Highest Political Office1728 Words   |  7 Pagesparticularly because of capitalism. The purpose of this essay is to demonstrate that capitalism is inherently a turbine that constantly produces and strengthens inequalities while finding pretexts to justify its negative outcomes. Racism and capitalism are distinct concepts whose correlation is as distinct as it is complex. In essence, capitalism is the key driver of racial inequalities as evidenced in society day. Before exploring the nature of the nexus between racism and capitalism, it is necessary toRead MoreRethinking Marx’s Concept of Class: Does the emergence of the so-called identity politics indicating the â€Å"fall† of class politics?1716 Words   |  7 Pagesconcept of Class was very remarkable particularly at the 19th century era, when the implication of The Age of Reason (Aufklarung) in Europe had contributed significant supports of changes in the development of sciences and the historical of thought at that time. Nevertheless, Marx progressive thought that was manifested in the concept of class has been questioned for decades since its capacity is considered ‘limited’ and somehow ‘irrelevant’ if it is applied to the contemporary social phenomena inRead Mo reThe Works Of Richard Robbins : Global Problem And The Culture Of Capitalism1268 Words   |  6 PagesGlobal Problems and the Culture of Capitalism, and Allan Johnson, Privilege, Power, and Difference, address privilege, inequality, and capitalism through sociological and historical references. Through reading and analyzing these works along with our class lectures it has become apparent that there is a clear relationship between these systems. Capitalism causes and enforces systems of inequality and privilege. Capitalism is able to do this through the construct of social reality, the matrix of capitalistRead MoreIs Homelessness Not Just A Problem?1714 Words   |  7 Pageschallenge to social justice. Through the tenets of the Critical Race Theory, it’s been statistically qualified and quantified that minority groups are frequently targeted and suffer from socioeconomic neglect, resulting in homelessness. The Lack of equal access to supportive political policies, as wel l as, economics, healthcare, mental health care, and other resources that are vital to survival. Yet this group of people continue to display resilience. It’s the civic duty of the social worker communityRead MoreCapitalism in America Essay1019 Words   |  5 PagesIn today’s world class is considered one of the most important issue in the United States. Class affects people no matter who the person is and the perspective view of class is mostly controlled by the media. In the book Rereading America, there are two essays, Class in America: Gregory Mantsios, Framing Class vicarious living and Conscious Consumption: Diana Kendall, and, the film Capitalism: A Love story: Michael Moore. Capitalism is an economic system that promotes free trade and private enterpriseRead MoreEssay on Aboriginal People of Canada1267 Words   |  6 PagesCanada Over the past decades, Aboriginal people (the original people or indigenous occupants of a particular country), have been oppressed by the Canadian society and continue to live under racism resulting in gender/ class oppression. The history of Colonialism, and Capitalism has played a significant role in the construction and impact of how Aborignal people are treated and viewed presently in the Canadian society. The struggles, injustices, prejudice, and discrimination that have plagued AboriginalRead MoreThe Wages Of Whiteness By David Roediger912 Words   |  4 Pagesis an extricable relationship between race, capitalism, and property and how it perpetuates the notion of whiteness through the exploitation of â€Å"others†. Property is a relationship of a person and an object; slaves were considered as objects. Race is constructed from white workers’ ideology of whiteness and labor wage. Racism has been long constructed through the production of race and its relations to property, and we can see it through the notion of capitalism and the idea of whiteness. In the Wages

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

1960’s course work the Beatles Free Essays

string(147) " radio in the 1960’s, was written in the 1990’s and there fore like some of the other source has the possibility of being exaggerated\." Source A can tell us many things about the impact of the Beatles in the 1960’s; they were considered new fresh and an extremely â€Å"cool† band. They were a nation wide love, everyone seemed to be watching then as their first priority, with shops and stalls all closed when the Beatles were on television. Even in rush hour, when many people were normally trying to make their way home or get to their destinations, the streets were deserted, everyone knew where and what time the Beatles were playing. We will write a custom essay sample on 1960’s course work the Beatles or any similar topic only for you Order Now It was as though the nation was put on to pause when the Beatles were about to perform. Joanna Lumley herself remembers being in a hurry to get home in order to not miss the Beatles playing on TV. The fans watched eagerly as though the Beatles were a drug many people were addicted to. The Beatles seemed to have caught every ones hearts and eyes; they had a new approach to music which seemed to be able to attract almost everyone. Many people saw the Beatles as icons; they were ‘cool, hip, smart, lippy, charming and funny.’ Definite icon qualities attractive to the young and the general public felt they could relate to them, often being called by their first names. The Beatles new approach to music , however , was not only loved by the public but was also highly influential in the entertainment and music industry providing inspiration to many bands and changing the face of music forever. For some people the 60’s was seen to be the best times of the life’s due to the new entertainment and what the Beatles brought in the way of fresh new music -‘it was very heaven to be alive’. Question 2 The effects of pop music in the 1960’s are shown in source A, B and C, however all in slightly different ways. Source C is a description of a Beatles concert by Paul Macartney in 1984, he talks of there being a lot of screaming- therefore implying more screaming than in 1984, when people must have been more held back and more reserved than the 60’s when at concerts seeing the live bands fans went crazy for seeing their star. This point was supported by source B, a description of a concert at which the stones were playing. However the audience is described a ‘maniacal, screaming mob’. They both talk of an extremely load and energetic crowd. However Paul Macartney believed many people exaggerated the crowds so they seemed like a manic mob when all they really wanted was to see their idols and the possibility of getting an autograph. It seems Macartney really knows what he is talking about and comes across as being nice and genuine to his fans talking of him chatting to his fans instead of running away from them in the manner of Jonny Ray. The way the Beatles were with their fans, being so friendly and willing to talk to them, may have been one of the reasons why the Beatles became so big. Source A really supports this fact, and tells us a lot of how big and popular they really were describing it as though they were everyone’s purpose to get home when they were performing on television. Source A does support source C on this point however I don’t think it supports it in any other way. Source B on the other hand doesn’t really support source C as they are extremely contradictory about what is said about the effects of pop music on fans being harmful or just very enthusiastic. Macartney knew that the fan crowds were completely harmless and controllable. Where as some stars such as the stones saw them as being dangerous, when all they really wanted was to be as close as possible to their pop star. The sources were all written some time after the 1960’s period, leaving time for exaggeration, source B is written closer to the 1960’s than sources A and C, and to me seems to be less likely to be exaggerated and more truthful about the facts and information that is given to us in the source. Although the sources do support each other on certain aspects, they don’t really give us a broad view of the effects of pop music in the 1960’s telling us very little apart from how big some bands were and how the fans reacting to them. Question 3 Sources D and E are not particularly useful in helping you to understand why many young people believed that the 1960’s gave them opportunities they had never had before. I think that the source were not particularly useful as they tell us only one aspect of young peoples lives at the time. However source D, and advert fro a popular music show ‘Ready, Steady, GO’ in the TV times in 1965 does tell us some useful points. The presenter, Cathy McGowan, was at the time an extremely popular model and an idol for many girls in Britain. They would copy her hair styles and dress sense. So fro many people it was the one show to see if u had an idol as they were likely to be shown on this show. It was the only show at the time which showed the public their music stars performing without them having to go to a concert. People were fanatical about seeing the show, it was compulsory viewing and the one and only time in the week the public got to hear and see popular music. Although very popular the show tended to represent older tastes in music and did not cater fro teenagers. The source is good in showing that music and popular culture had a great impact upon how people viewed television and how celebrities became real stars, and were able to become idolised by the young. Source E, a description of radio in the 1960’s, was written in the 1990’s and there fore like some of the other source has the possibility of being exaggerated. You read "1960’s course work the Beatles" in category "Papers" However the source does tell us some useful point whether exaggerated or not. Radio before the 1960’s did not cater to the teenage audience and the source implies that many teenagers had nothing much to listen to that was provided on the radio for them, before the invention of ‘Radio Luxembourg’saying that many teenagers were stuck with their parents. The new channel provided precisely what the young wanted, and because of that, would have been extremely popular providing a channel that played popular new music which no other radio station had done before. It was a great opportunity in the eyes of the young and the channel which was specifically directed towards them played nothing but pop music and was very commercial, the older generation were not so fond of it. But it helped music to become a much more dominant talking point for the young. Even thought reception was dismal and faded out every minute or so it was the only way to hear pop music on the radio at the time and many people now remember it fondly. The two sources both support the fact that music and celebrities were more broadcast and that for them was a huge opportunity, however neither of them tells us anything of other aspects of opportunity in teenagers’ lives and are therefore not very useful in helping us to understand why many young people believed they had more opportunities. Question 4 The 1960’s was a period of great changes, some for the better and others consider by some people for the worst. Some people did not like the changes that occurred and came to see the 1960’d as a period of bad influences on British society. Source F is part of an article from the Daily Mail, a conservative newspaper, reflecting right-wing political views. This shows how Mrs Whitehouse had traditional views and values and it is portrayed in the article that she was not pleased by the changes in the 1960’s. The source talks about Mrs White house launching ‘a national campaign’ to help writers who she believed deserved to have their work shown on television rather than the television shows she obviously disapproved of such as ‘Coronation Street’ which started on ITV in the 1960’s and showed everyday life. She obviously believed many programmes unsuitable to viewers and thought that they should be replaced with more Christian viewed programmes, replacing the scenes of sex, drugs and violence with more traditional valued programmes. Mrs Whitehouse would have also been a different generation, a teenager in the 1920’s with less power than that of the teens of the 1960’s.the 1920’s were different for social Values, with a far more traditional type of society were teenagers had less freedom of expression and more responsibilities. In source G we are told of a singer, Janis Joplin who was extremely popular and at a time where music played an important part in social life popular singers were idolised. Many bands at the time were taking drugs, drinking, and staying out late in popular clubs and at the time there was a huge drug culture. Many other bands and musicians such as the top Mod band, The Who, wrote and performed what appeared to be socially dangerous music. They were also part of the ‘Psychedelia movement’, encouraging experimentation with drugs. It was these people , Janis Joplin and The Who , which the young idolised and had great influence over, to people like Mrs Whitehouse they were bed role models and set the scene of drugs to seem ‘cool’ and acceptable. Although Janis Joplin was a worse case scenario, she died of a drug over dose this at least showed teenagers the problems of drugs. Teenagers appeared to be following in their idols footsteps and it somewhat seemed as tough they were being encouraged to be rebellious and have freedom of expression rather than have responsibility and obligation. Many saw the introduction of the contraceptive pill and the legalisation of abortions as an increase in sexual immorality and were seen with disaprovement. The combined effect of the pill and abortion however did allow women to plan their lives with more ease and effectiveness. They could then limit the number of children and decide when they wanted them. This provided many women with more control over their lives. However Mrs Mary Whitehouse would have and I am sure did believe that they would encourage immorality and sex before marriage which were both against the Christian beliefs. Some also believed that it could lead to a break down of social values. Some people began to believe that these changes were not a good thing for society, and that the changes were undermining the family and as a result creating a weaker society, it would have been people such as Mrs Whitehouse who would have seen things in this way, people who believed in more traditional views and values. Whether this is correct I do not know, however even though something’s such as drugs were more than likely a bad influence on society, without many of the changes the world would have become a very different place and women would possibly lead very different lives. Things such as the pill and abortion were definitely in my opinion great movement in science and a huge advantage fro women, however I can see why people with Christian views were opposed to it and how they later become to se the 60’s as a period of bad influences with a higher rate of teenage pregnancies it is possible to blame it on the changes and a possible increase in sexual immorality. I think that many people who thought it was a period of bad influence were possibly mostly the older generation – Mrs Whitehouse’s generation who felt afraid of the dramatic change in society and the behaviour of the young in the 1960 in comparison to their day. They would have also been the right age to have children of teenage to twenties who would have been experiencing all the changes the society now allowed them. Such as drugs and even dramatic changed in fashion with the introduction of the mini skirt, a huge thing at that time to be wearing a skirt 8 inches above the knee and it was so new and different. For many people change is scary and this was a period of huge change some good some bad however it is always easy to look back and see only the bad and not what was good from the 60’s also. Question 5 The quote ‘Popular culture in the 1960’s did more harm than good’ I believe to be untrue. The 1960’s did have some bad points which were possibly bad at that in that period and have not continued through to this day whereas most of the good things that were brought about in the 1960’s such a new fresh exciting music ‘rock ‘n’ roll’ and new bands such as the Beatles, the new fashions and social ways of life have been continued and adapted to the way of life which we lead nowadays. The 1960’s was highly dominated by teenagers, they had more money from a new affluence and were able to buy more music records and clothing and were respected by the entertainment industry (source H) for what they did for music and television. Source A tells us of ‘Beatle Mania’ the Beatles were one of the most popular bands and were highly influential upon teenagers and the music industry. Source A is useful in telling us the extent of the effect of the Beatles upon the general public and how popular they really were. However the source is possibly exaggerated as the writer Joanna Lumley looks back on her past. I believe the public chose the Beatles to be their number one band because of their sheer personality on and off stage, but was equally as much to do with their musical style and material, and with the British youth with far more control over what was popular and what wasn’t, they decided the Beatles were the best, taking the rest of the country with them. The Beatles pioneered the British cultural invasion of the states and the world and allowed many other bands and creative people to follow in their footsteps and show the world what they could do. The fact the Beatles music is still known and liked today shows they were an extraordinary band, and the way they saw their fans and audiences differently too many other bands would have help in their success. In source B a concert is described and The Stones were playing, the writer of the source ‘doubts if the stones ever played so close to their audience again.’ and describes The Stones being surrounded by ‘a heaving maniacal mob’. This was not how Paul Macartney described his audiences, yes they were usually hysterical but never harmful. He describes them as screaming a lot but not appearing to be scary or in any way threatening. I believe that the Beatles and the many other bands of the sixties made the way for the way our music is now, so many bands are influenced from bands from the sixties and many bands today which try to invent their own individual style like the Beatles had. The Beatles seemed to sum up the sixties with the music they wrote, their clothes, hair, accents, and their off hand attitudes they were a recipe fro success. However their impact upon teenagers was unbelievable, they became not just performers, they were heroes. I think this type of idolising someone was harmful however, what with the drug culture in the 1960’s many bands including the Beatles were taking drugs. Source G, a extract form a biography of Janis Joplin, a rebellious teenager with a powerful blues voice became highly successful and lived a life of ‘sex, dugs, and rock ‘n’ roll’ always taking things to excess she died of a drug over dose in 1970. It was people like these who were obviously highly covered in the media through their popularity and the drug habits and the way that all of them were doing it made it seem socially acceptable. These people were the young’s idols they looked up to them and copied what they did, the example they set was not the right one and that it was probably one of the reasons some people came to see the sixties popular culture as doing harm, and I probably agree with that. However I do think that the popularity of drugs died out as the years went past and although people still take them today by no means are they considered at all socially acceptable. Television and radio were also greatly changed due to the new market of teenagers wanting to hear pop music. New radio stations were set up, such as the start of ‘Radio Luxembourg (source E) after producers realised that teenagers were the way of the future. And the teens didn’t even mind if the reception was lousy and faded out every minute or so it was the only radio station that gave them the chance to hear the music they wanted to listen to, and there was nothing like that before. Then in 1964 ‘Radio Caroline’ began broadcasting, this was pirate radio but was extremely popular with teenagers who could hear non stop pop music for the first time. However was extremely unpopular with the BBC and the government who tried to have them banned. The new shows introduced on to TV such as, ‘Ready, Steady, Go’ (source D) and ‘Top of the Pops’ showing the pop music stars performing in front of their very eyes without having to go to a concert. ‘Ready Steady Go’ was compulsory viewing and had a wonderfully catchy cry,’ the weekend starts here!’, giving the feeling of excitement and freedom. The presenter at the time was a popular model and with fashion being very influential upon the young it was yet another reason to watch the show. To most people the music industry was just as case of the young having fun but some people saw the young losing their sense of responsibility and obligation. Others saw other programmes as being morally un-suitable such as the new programmes showing life as it really was and more scenes of sex, alcohol, and drugs. People such as Mrs Mary Whitehouse believed this (source F). She believed that the traditional family values were being lost through the wrong and influential shows on television and that they should be replaced with more Christian shows which had a sense of purpose. However the 60’s didn’t sacrifice things such as education as there were nearly twice as many people in full time education in 1969 than in 1961. Showing that the young were just having a good social life and were being better educated as a generation. I think overall the 60’s did more good than harm, the period brought in many new and exciting things and gave women more control over their life with the introduction of the pill and legalisation of abortion. Fashion was new and exciting and always changing with the invention of the mini skirt which was controversial to say the least. I do think that young people were encouraged to act irresponsibly and it somewhat seemed almost expected of them. However I don’t think it has done any real harm to society in the long run. However I think without all the changes that took place society would have been a worse place of less freedom and more constriction, I don’t think the changes that took place have done any real harm and that the changes would have probably taken place in some other period if they had not happen it the 60’s. How to cite 1960’s course work the Beatles, Papers

Monday, May 4, 2020

jesus i am statements Essay Example For Students

jesus i am statements Essay The Eight Miracles Featured in JohnIn the book of John we find eight great sign miracles that inspire us to look to Christ believe and live. All of these sign miracles point to the deity of Christ. John 20:30-31 reads, ?Therefore many other signs Jesus also performed in the presence of the disciples, which are not written in this book; but these have been written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that at believing you may have life in His name. These eight sign miracles reveal the powers of God and leave no doubt as to the Deity of Jesus. Turning of water into wine (John 2:1-11)The first expression of Jesus power was done at the celebration of a marriage in Cana of Galilee. Jesus and his disciples were invited to a wedding, where He turned water into wine. The purpose of this miracle was to prove His real nature to his disciples and reveal his glory. The immediate result of this miracle manifested the glory of Jesus, which caused his disciples to believe on him . Healing of a nobleman?s son (John 4:46-54)The second of John?s signs, by which he hopes his readers will come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing might obtain eternal life is the healing of a nobleman?s son. Jesus Christ came again to Cana in Galilee where a nobleman approached him and told him about his sick and dying son in Capernaum. The nobleman asked Jesus to heal him and Jesus spoke the word of healing, and the boy was healed through the faith of the nobleman in Jesus Christ. When the nobleman arrived at his house he found his child healed; when he enquired to the hour of healing, the time confirmed that it was done at the time that Jesus spoke the words of certain healing. This miracle was done to demonstrate Jesus? power over space and to illustrates the fact that social status is no barrier to entrance into the kingdom . Healing of a lame man (John 5:1-9)The third miracle that Jesus performed was the healing of a lame man at the p ool of Bethesda, in Jerusalem. In the porticoes, lay a multitude of those who were sick, blind, lame, and withered. They were waiting for the moving of the waters. They waited, because, at certain seasons, an angel of the Lord went down to the pool and stirred up the water. After the stirring, the first person who stepped into the water was made well from his disease. While Jesus was in Jerusalem for the Feast of the Tabernacles, he observed the infirmed man who had lain near the sheep market pool for years, hoping for relief from his condition. He was unable to join the impotent multitude that waited for the angels to trouble the waters and make them whole, because of his condition making him unable to reach the waters first. Jesus asked him Wilt thou be made whole? and instructed him to Rise, take up thy bed and walk. The man immediately took up his bed and walked on the Sabbath Day. This angered the Jews because the Holy Day of Sabbath was violated. Jesus made the point with them that it was His Fathers Will of when and how to use His Power. God chooses the timing of His miracles, and He chooses the deliverance of those He will. Jesus Christ healed the lame man through the expression of the powers of God, to show a greater authority over the law of Sabbath, and exemplify the power over time given to Christ . Feeding of the 5,000 (John 6:1-14)The fourth sign miracle is the feeding of the five thousand. Near the Passover, Jesus is on a mountain speaking to His Disciples and when He looks up, he sees a huge crowd coming to Him. He challenges the disciple?s faith by asking where they will buy bread for all these people. The disciples find the test overwhelming. Andrew, even though seeing the raw materials Jesus will use, fails to look to Him as being able to provide. This miracle is done to show Jesus as the Creator, Elohim. It shows Him as sufficiency where a deficiency exists, in this instance, over an inadequate food supply. It shows Jesus? power over quantity. Jesus never has to turn away those who come to Him, no matter how many; He is sufficient to meet all of our needs . Jesus walking on the water (John 6:15-21)While Jesus Christ went to the mountain, his disciples went down to the sea and entered a ship headed toward Capernaum. In the dark of the night, the sea rose up, and there was a great wind blowing upon them. After rowing fifty-five furlongs, they spotted Jesus walking upon the sea, and approaching close to the ship, which caused them to fear. Jesus reassured the scared disciples that it was him; they willingly received him, at which point the ship had immediately reached its destination. Digital Signature EssayThis was the third time that Jesus showed himself to his disciples. It is important to note that Jesus Christ was outwardly changed after his Resurrection. The disciples did not recognize his outward appearance, but knew he was the Lord in their spiritual instinct . While Jesus walked this earth, he reflected the signs given by His Father through the power expressed through him by God. Each miracle that is recorded in the book of John showed the power of God over a specific thing. Dr. Towns was brilliant in organizing these different powers into reflecting the deeper things of God, and concluding that these powers reflect the absolute control of God. Even though disagreement exists concerning the exact origin and process of the unfolding miracles, there is no disagreement that their reflections magnify the power and glory of Christ today, has He wields them perfectly with His Deified Nature of God. Work CitedCalvin, John. Calvins Commentaries. Vol. XVIII. Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2005. 22 vols. Fortna, Robert Tomson. ?The gospel of John and the signs gospel.? In what we have heard from the beginning, 149-158. Waco, Tex: Baylor Univ Pr, 2007. Harrington, Daniel J. ?Signs of Gods Power and Glory.? America 196, no. 1: 31. 2007. Holy Bible. The King James Study Bible. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, Inc., 1988. Kruse, Colin G. The Tyndale New Testament Commentaries: John. Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2003. Morris, Leon. Jesus is the Christ: Studies in the Theology of John. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1989Tenney, Merrill C. The Expositor?s Bible Commentary. Vol. 9. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1981. Towns, Elmer. The Gospel of John: Believe and Live. Ed. Mel and Ed Hindson Couch. Chattanooga: AMG Publishers, 2002. Olbricht, Thomas H. The theology of the signs in the Gospel of John. In Johannine studies, 171-181. Malibu, Calif: Pepperdine Univ Pr, 1989.

Sunday, March 29, 2020

Why Mitchell V Wisconsin Sucked Essays - Barry Goldwater

Why Mitchell v Wisconsin Sucked On June 11, 1993, the United State Supreme Court upheld Wisconsin?s penalty enhancement law, which imposes harsher sentences on criminals who ?intentionally select the person against whom the crime...is committed..because of the race, religion, color, disability, sexual orientation, national origin or ancestry of that person.? Chief Justice Rehnquist deliverd the opinion of the unanimous Court. This paper argues against the decision, and will attempt to prove the unconstitutionality of such penalty enhancement laws.

Saturday, March 7, 2020

Vocabulary Tips Words You Never Knew Were Latin!

Vocabulary Tips Words You Never Knew Were Latin! Words You Never Knew Were Latin! Some of you may know someone who shows off by dropping Latin phrases into conversation. But Latin isn’t all about sounding pretentious. Hundreds of common English words have Latin origins. We even spell some words the same as the Romans used to! In this blog post, then, we’re looking at a few English terms that you may already use in your written work without realizing where they come from. 1. Campus Latin Academic writing is full of obscure Latin words. But there are some more familiar terms you’ll hear on campus that come from Latin. One of these, in fact, is â€Å"campus.† In Roman times, this word simply meant â€Å"field.† It was first used for a college campus to describe a field near the College of New Jersey (now better known as Princeton University) in 1774. The original college campus.(Photo: Filipe Fortes/flickr) Other Latin terms that have found a place in academia include â€Å"thesis† (which originally meant â€Å"to set down†) and â€Å"calculus† (which comes from a small pebble used for counting). 2. Did Romans Drive Cars? The Romans were better known for chariots than motor vehicles, but they did invent the word â€Å"motor.† This meant â€Å"mover,† so it was later applied to any machine that supplies power. Turtle-powered chariots never caught on. And given that we use the word â€Å"motor† in relation to cars, it is appropriate that â€Å"petroleum† also comes from Latin. To be specific, it’s a medieval combination of the words for â€Å"rock† (petra) and â€Å"oil† (oleum). But we wouldn’t recommend asking for â€Å"rock oil† at the gas station. 3. Cinnamon on Asparagus Food has changed a lot since ancient Rome, but we do still use some Latin terms when we’re hungry! These include â€Å"asparagus,† â€Å"citrus,† and â€Å"cinnamon.† In addition, if you enjoy the traditional approach of combining ingredients while making a meal, you might follow a â€Å"recipe.† 4. The End of the Year The Roman calendar only had ten months to begin with, so it was different from ours. But we do get our month names from Latin, including three that are unchanged: October, November, and December. As the names suggest, these were originally the eighth, ninth, and tenth months in the year. Going from this image, were guessing December was the month of snake stretching.(Photo: Ad Meskens/Wikimedia) Later, however, Julius and Augustus (now July and August) were introduced after June (or Junius as it was then). Despite their names, October, November, and December thus became the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth months of the year respectively. This makes it even stranger that these terms are still spelled the same as they were more than 2000 years ago!

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Western European music Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Western European music - Assignment Example The compositions made during this time normally consisted of three or four movements, and all of them had their own particular features. Corelli took over the art of San Petronio directly whilst he was staying in Bologna for four years. The sonatas he wrote were for violin. Besides, he also wrote sonatas called sonate a tre (trio sonatas) which had two violins as well as organ for the church. There was also a violone, called a double bass in contemporary terms, or a harpsichord from the chamber. After the sonatas took place the development of concertos.Corelli himself wrote the first concerti grossitogether with Torelli. Vivaldi wrote the concertos later, one being The Four Seasons, composed in 1723. This is termed as Vivaldi’s best work and lies among the most famous Baroque music.The Four Seasonsis made up of four violin concertos and every concerto has a different texture, corresponding to the respective season.When Vivaldi wrote The Four Seasons there had not been the development of modern solo form of concerto. And thus, this composition had basically solo violin, string quartet and basso continuo which together defined it. Orchestral Suites were composed by Johann Sebastian Bach and are made up ofseveral compositions. These suites are also called overtures which are opening movementswherein there is a part of slow dotted note rhythm after which comes a fugue. The instruments used for thesecompositions were oboe, bassoon, violin, viola, and basso continuo. Through his orchestral suites Bach provided amazing pieces and these are great examples of the composer’s innovative mastery of the several types of dances which had been extremely famous in the European courts during the 18th century. Suite No. 1 is inC major. After the previous sequence ends and before this one begins there takes place kind of a quiet pause in the action. Pifa is known as the pastoral symphony and it allows for a quiet